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Pitt+Me Sleep, Health, and Well-being Study


STUDY BASICS

Are you at retired male who is at least 60 years old? You may be able to participate in a research study to learn more about how sleep, health, and functioning are affected by former years of shift work. To evaluate this, researchers are comparing people who worked shift work with people who did not. Compensation provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Poor sleep habits can increase the risk of depression, memory problems, heart disease, and diabetes. However, little is known about how repeated sleep disruptions might affect health later in life.

The purpose of this research study is to find out if a past history of shift work (night work on a permanent or rotating basis) has any long-term effect on a person’s sleep, health and well-being. As part of this study, researchers will compare results from shift workers and non-shift workers.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?

•    Men aged 60 and up
•    Retired
•    Not using insulin
•    Non-smoker


WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Study participation will vary from person to person and may include questionnaires, interviews, a medical evaluation, a blood sample, a sleep diary, an overnight at-home sleep study, a heart health study, and a 60 hour sleep study.


IRB:
  PRO14120523B - Sleep, Circadian Rhythms & Cardiometabolic Risk in Retired Shift Workers

RESEARCH AREAS:
  Healthy Aging


Age Range
AGE:   60 and Up

Duration DURATION:  Multiple visits over 3 months

Location LOCATION: 
Oakland - multiple locations
Compensation COMPENSATION: 
Up to $450




Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230
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Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
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MEET THE RESEARCHERS


Martica H. Hall

Martica H. Hall, PhD, has been a member of the University of Pittsburgh Sleep and Chronobiology Center for 20 years. A health psychologist by training, Dr. Hall’s research goal is to advance our understanding of how psychological factors and sleep interact to influence physical health. She has studied these relationships in diverse populations across the lifespan, focusing mainly on mid- to late-life adults at increased risk for poor health outcomes including caregivers, women during the menopausal transition, individuals with sleep and psychiatric disorders, and adults affected by racial/social disparities.





Daniel J. Buysse

Daniel J. Buysse, MD, has over 25 years of experience in sleep medicine research and has worked extensively with older patients in sleep and circadian rhythm studies. His main areas of focus include sleep assessment and patient reported outcomes; evaluation and treatment of insomnia; and sleep in aging. He has also investigated sleep in mood disorders, and the interaction between sleep and circadian physiology. This research uses a variety of techniques such as self-report, actigraphy, home and laboratory-based polysomnography, laboratory-based circadian assessments, and functional imaging studies. Dr. Buysse has also conducted clinical trials of behavioral treatment for insomnia.





MEET THE COORDINATOR


Sarah Kimutis

Sarah K. Kimutis, BA, received her degree in Psychology from Seton Hill University. Ms. Kimutis is a research specialist. She has worked at the University of Pittsburgh and with her current group since August of 2016.




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