Effects of Chemotherapy on Sperm Cells


STUDY BASICS

Are you a man age 18-50 who is scheduled to undergo treatment with chemotherapy for a medical condition? If so, you may be able to participate in a research study to find out if the sperm collected shortly after starting chemotherapy is safe and effective for future use.


STUDY PURPOSE

Certain types of chemotherapy may place people at high risk for infertility. It is currently recommended that men cryopreserve (freeze) semen prior to the start of chemotherapy, but that does not always occur.

In some cases, men want to freeze semen just after starting chemotherapy. While these men may still have normal sperm counts, it is unknown if this sperm would be safe to use in the future.

The purpose of this study is to find out if sperm collected shortly after starting chemotherapy is safe and effective to use in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?

•    Men between 18-50 years of age who are scheduled to undergo treatment with chemotherapy for a medical condition


WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Study participation involves semen collection before and after chemotherapy begins.

The study will cover the costs for semen analysis, sperm freezing, and the first year of storage for all participants who complete the study. After the first year, participants will pay a storage fee (approximately $300/year) if they wish to continue storing their samples.


IRB:
  PRO12080254 - Short Term Genetic Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation on Male Germ Cells

Age Range
AGE:   18 - 50

Duration VISITS:  2 visits

Location LOCATION: 
UPMC Magee Womens Hospital

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MEET THE RESEARCHER


Kyle Orwig

Kyle E. Orwig, PhD, is professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Orwig is also the director of the Fertility Preservation Program of UPMC. Dr. Orwig is an experienced and respected researcher at the Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI), where he oversees his own lab. His lab focuses on studying the studies normal development of fertility at a molecular level, to better understand conditions that lead to infertility and develop treatments for them. Dr. Orwig is also the director of the Fertility Preservation Program.





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