Stroke Survey and Focus Group


STUDY BASICS

Did you have a stroke that occurred over 1 year ago? Do you still have some hand weakness? If so, you may be able to take part in a focus group to help researchers learn about your experience with stroke and how it affected your hand function. Compensation provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Stroke is a leading cause of disability, with nearly 800,000 strokes occurring in the United States every year. Half of all stroke survivors have lasting hand impairment, which limits their ability to perform daily tasks and greatly decreases their independence.

Researchers are interested in finding out if brain-computer interface (BCI) technology could be used to replace lost hand function in people who have suffered a subcortical stroke. BCI works by placing electrodes on the scalp, and then brain signals are used to move a device.

The purpose of this research study is to gather information from people who have had a stroke about their stroke history, functional limitations, and opinions about BCI technology. Researchers hope their findings will lead to improved methods for helping people with subcortical strokes in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?

•    Ages 18 and up
•    Had a stroke that occurred at least one year ago and that was confirmed by MRI scan
•    Have minimal finger strength or ability to open your hand
•    No other central nervous system disease besides stroke, such as Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, etc.


WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Participation involves screening procedures that will be done during 1 or multiple visits over a period of up to 6 months. During these visits, you will be asked questions, have your finger strength tested, and provide authorization for the researchers to review your medical records. If you are found to be eligible, you will then be asked to take part in a focus group session lasting up to 3 hours. You will be asked to complete questionnaires, share your experiences about daily functioning after having a stroke, and offer your opinions on brain-computer interface technology and how it may or may not be able to help people like you.


IRB:
  PRO17060115 - Brain-Computer Interface Technology for Individuals with Stroke

Age Range
AGE:   18 and Up

Duration DURATION:  Up to 6 months
VISITS:  2 or more

Location LOCATION: 
University of Pittsburgh Rehab Neural Engineering Labs – Oakland

Compensation COMPENSATION: 
$20
I'M INTERESTED
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MEET THE RESEARCHER


Jennifer Collinger

Jennifer L. Collinger, PhD, is a Research Biomedical Engineer and Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh. A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Collinger’s research interests include neurorehabilitation and brain-computer interface technology for individuals with motor impairments.




MEET THE COORDINATOR


Debbie Harrington

Debbie Harrington is the senior research coordinator in the Rehabilitation and Neural Engineering Research Laboratories at the University of Pittsburgh. Debbie graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in engineering. She currently provides regulatory and recruitment support for the labs’ human research studies. Her primary research focus is brain-computer interface research for individuals with disabilities.





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