Infant Development Study - Infant with Sibling Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)


STUDY BASICS

Are you the parent of a child between 0-3 months old? Does your child have an older sibling diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder? You and your child may be able to participate in an online research study designed to learn more about how children develop. Participation involves 8 online video chats.


STUDY PURPOSE

During the first few months of life, infants learn to sit independently and to reach for and grasp objects. These early motor skills are thought to be very important for a child’s continuing development.

The purpose of this study is to understand how children develop early motor skills. Researchers hope their findings may lead to better early intervention strategies for infants at high risk for autism spectrum disorder.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOUR CHILD?

•    Parent of a 0-3 month old baby that was born full term
•    Parent of another child who has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder
•    Have an internet connection
•    Have a computer, tablet, or smartphone with a camera
•    Have video chat software such as Skype or FaceTime


WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Participation involves 8 weekly visits with you and your baby via video chat. Each visit takes about 5 minutes. During each online visit, a member of the study team will observe your baby interacting with objects and trying to sit independently.


IRB:
  PRO13100320B - Developmental assessments at a distance: Internet based study of infant development

RELATED STUDIES

Internet-Based Study of Infant Development [Pediatric] (PRO13100320A)


Age Range
AGE:   0 - 1

Duration DURATION:  5 minutes each
VISITS:  8 video chats

Location LOCATION: 
Online only

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MEET THE RESEARCHER


Klaus Libertus

Klaus Libertus, PhD, is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. A graduate of Duke University, Dr. Libertus’ research interests include the role of motor development for social cognition abilities in typically developing children and in children at risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD).





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