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We're sorry. This study is closed and no longer recruiting participants.

STUDY BASICS

Are you a relatively healthy adult between the ages of 28 and 56? If so, you may be able to participate in a research study to help learn more about the relationship between social and behavioral factors, brain function, and heart health. Compensation provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

A person’s heart health can be affected by many social and behavioral factors, including stress, personal interactions, diet, and physical activity. The purpose of this study is to help researchers better understand the relationship between social and behavioral factors, brain function, and heart health. Researchers hope their findings will lead to better heart health interventions in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?
  • Ages 28-56
  • Not receiving medical treatment or taking medication for high blood pressure, heart disease, or neurological conditions.
  • Not taking immunosuppressant medications
  • Not using insulin for treatment of diabetes
  • Not undergoing chemotherapy

WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Participation involves 8 visits over the course of 32-35 months. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires, provide medical history information, have physical activity assessments and heart, lung, and blood vessel function assessments, provide blood and hair samples, have blood pressure measured in daily life, and have brain scans using MRI. MRI scans are not invasive and do not use radiation.


IRB: STUDY19030012
- Neurobiology of Adult Health (NOAH) Project

RESEARCH AREAS:
  Healthy Volunteer

PHONE NUMBER: 1-866-438-8230
SHARE STUDY
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INTERESTED?

Visit pittplusme.org/study/1393 and click on "I'm Interested" or call 1-866-438-8230.


LEARN MORE

PittPlusMe.org
1-866-438-8230
PittPlusMe@pitt.edu
@PittPlusMe
@PittPlusMe

MEET THE RESEARCHERS


Peter Gianaros

Peter J. Gianaros, PhD, is a Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. A graduate of Penn State University, Dr. Gianaros’ research interests include the neurobiology of psychological stress, emotion, socioeconomic health disparities, and cardiovascular disease risk.





Thomas Kamarck

Thomas W. Kamarck, PhD, is a Professor of Psychology and Chair of the Biological and Health Program in the Department of Psychology. A graduate of the University of Oregon, Dr. Kamarck studies how behavioral and biological factors impact risk for heart disease and hypertension.