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STUDY BASICS

Have you recently had suicidal thoughts and engaged in non-suicidal self-injury, such as cutting? Are you aged 18-24? You may be able to participate in a research study to help better understand why some people harm themselves on purpose and to learn more about how physical pain and emotional pain may be related in the brain. Compensation provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors occur in many young people. The purpose of this research study is to better understand why some people harm themselves on purpose and to learn more about how physical pain and emotional pain may be related in the brain. Researchers hope their findings may lead to better interventions for people experiencing suicidal thoughts or behaviors in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?
  • Ages 18-24
  • Have recently had suicidal thoughts
  • Have engaged in non-suicidal self-injury, such as cutting

WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

The study involves online interviews, four phone calls, and an MRI scan. At certain times during the MRI scan, participants will experience brief pain in the finger via electrical nerve stimulation.


IRB:
  STUDY19070448A - Neural markers of NSSI and Suicide Risk: Acute Physical Pain Modulation of Neural Processing of Social Rejection

RESEARCH AREAS:
  Featured Research


Age Range
AGE:   18-24

Duration DURATION:  4 months
VISITS:  1 in-person & 1 remote

Location LOCATION: 
UPMC Presbyterian Hospital, Online, and By Phone
Compensation COMPENSATION: 

Up to $170

Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230
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Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230

MEET THE RESEARCHER


Caroline Oppenheimer

Caroline Oppenheimer, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. After earning a PhD in Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Denver in 2014, Dr. Oppenheimer moved to Pittsburgh to complete a clinical psychology internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC. Dr. Oppenheimer has research and clinical experience working with children and adolescents, and her current research focuses on predicting risk for mood problems in young people. In addition to publishing numerous peer-reviewed papers in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Translational Psychiatry, and other important scientific journals, Dr. Oppenheimer has presented her findings at scientific conferences and meetings throughout the United States and Canada.  Dr. Oppenheimer has been very active in the WPH Services for Teens at Risk (STAR Center) program, where she lead a parent group for the intensive outpatient program and co-lead the STAR Transition to Adulthood group for young adults transitioning out of the STAR program.




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