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Pitt+Me Memory and Sleep Study


STUDY BASICS

Are you aged 60-85? Are you experiencing difficulties with memory or managing daily tasks, or have you been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment? If so, you may be eligible to participate in a research study to examine the effects of magnetic brain stimulation on sleep and cognitive function. Involves one 48-hour overnight stay in the sleep lab. Compensation and parking are provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Many people experience changes in their sleep patterns as they age. Unfortunately, poor sleep in older adults can lead to problems with thinking and memory and can contribute to mental decline.

The purpose of this study is to find out if magnetic brain stimulation can alter sleep patterns and cognition in older adults. Researchers hope their findings will lead to better ways to improve sleep and brain health in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?

•    Ages 60-85
•    Experiencing difficulties with memory or managing daily tasks, or have been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment
•    No personal or family history of seizures or epilepsy
•    Not taking any sleep medications
•    Not taking any psychiatric medications
•    Willing and able to undergo MRI scanning (no metal in body or claustrophobia)


WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Participation involves an initial telephone call with the study team to be sure you are eligible to be scheduled for the first visit. If eligible after the phone call, participants will have a daytime visit to the sleep lab during which they will complete questionnaires and assessments. Participants will also be provided with an apnea assessment device to use at home for one night, and an activity monitor and sleep diary.

If eligible after an assessment of the results of your apnea monitor, sleep diary, and activity watch, participants will have a second visit that involves staying in the sleep lab for two consecutive days and nights – a total of 48 hours. Participants will complete computer tasks during the day and will be monitored during sleep at night. Each morning, participants will complete additional cognitive tasks and a 20-minute MRI scan. On the evening of the second night, some participants will be randomly assigned (like the flip of a coin) to receive either brain stimulation or mock stimulation.


IRB:
  STUDY19040083 - Prefrontal cortex stimulation: Improving cognition through slow-wave sleep

Age Range
AGE:   60 - 85

Duration VISITS:  2 visits

Location LOCATION: 
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Oakland
Compensation COMPENSATION: 
Up to $250 + meal vouchers for overnight stay and parking provided at no cost
Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230
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Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230

MEET THE RESEARCHER


Kristine Wilckens

Kristine A. Wilckens, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. A graduate of New York University and the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Wilckens’ interests include sleep as a promoter of brain health and cognition, neural processes during sleep that influence cognitive function, the extent to which sleep affects cognitive function throughout the lifespan, and whether sleep can be used to improve cognitive function.




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