Hero image with Pittsburgh background pittplusme.org/study/1734

STUDY BASICS

Did you have a stroke more than 6 months ago and are still experiencing arm weakness from the stroke? Are you aged 21-70? You may be able to participate in a research study to help learn more about the use of electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and spinal nerves for restoring arm movement. Participation involves up to 30 in-person visits. Compensation and travel reimbursement provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Many people who have had a stroke experience long-term arm weakness that makes it difficult to do daily tasks. Although physical therapy can help restore function in the arm for some people who have had a stroke, many do not fully recover.   

 

The purpose of this study is to learn more about the use of spinal cord and spinal nerve neurostimulation to restore arm movement in people who have had a stroke. Researchers hope their findings will lead to better ways to treat people experiencing arm weakness following a stroke in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?
  • Ages 21-70
  • Had a stroke more than 6 months ago
  • Have arm weakness
  • Do not have any implanted medical devices
  • Willing to attend up to 30 in-person visits, including at least 2 visits a week for 30 days

WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Participation involves up to 30 study visits over about nine months, but most visits will take place during a 30-day timeframe chosen to accommodate the participant’s schedule. Study procedures include pre-operative evaluation, an outpatient medical procedure, and up to four weeks of testing. Assessments include questionnaires, MRI scans, and blood draws.


IRB: STUDY19090210
- Spinal Cord Stimulation for restoration of arm and hand function in people with subcortical stroke

PHONE NUMBER: 1-866-438-8230
SHARE STUDY
Printer Printer   Email A FriendEmail A Friend   ShareShare   TweetTweet   Linked-InLinked-In

INTERESTED?

Visit pittplusme.org/study/1734 and click on "I'm Interested" or call 1-866-438-8230.


LEARN MORE

PittPlusMe.org
1-866-438-8230
PittPlusMe@pitt.edu
@PittPlusMe
@PittPlusMe

MEET THE RESEARCHER


Marco Capogrosso

Marco Capogrosso, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. A graduate of Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna in Italy, Dr. Capogrosso’s research interests include arm paralysis, brain computer interfaces, neuroprosthetics, and spinal cord injury.




MEET THE COORDINATOR


Amy Boos

Amy Boos, MSBME, OTR/L, is a Kinematic Occupational Therapist at the University of Pittsburgh. Amy is interested in the development and application of advanced technology for the understanding and treatment of neurological injury.