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STUDY BASICS

Are you the parent or legal guardian of a child between 10-17 years old? You and your child may be eligible for a research study to help us learn how to improve emotional health in adolescents and adults. Compensation is provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh are currently looking for youth and adolescents to participate in a research study about the development of brain function that supports the ability to ignore distracting emotional events and situations in the environment in adolescents and adults. We hope this study will improve our understanding why some adolescents and adults go on to develop more severe emotional health problems and others do not. The research study does not involve any treatments or medications. 


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOUR CHILD?

Eligible participants are:

  • Youth and adolescents between 10-17 years old 

WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

Participation involves: completing questionnaires in the lab and at home, completing computer tasks in the lab over the course of 3 years, and 3 fMRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and EEG (electroencephalogram) scans over the course of 3 years, measuring your child's brain activity during some computer tasks. 

 


IRB: STUDY22050193A
- Neurodevelopment of Emotional Interference Resistance in Adolescence to Adulthood: A Multimodal Neuroimaging Approach

RESEARCH AREAS:
  Healthy Child


PHONE NUMBER: 1-866-438-8230
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INTERESTED?

Visit pittplusme.org/study/2625 and click on "I'm Interested" or call 1-866-438-8230.


LEARN MORE

PittPlusMe.org
1-866-438-8230
PittPlusMe@pitt.edu
@PittPlusMe
@PittPlusMe

MEET THE RESEARCHER


Neil Patrick Jones

Neil P. Jones is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. A 1999 graduate of Cornell University, Dr. Jones earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2007 from Duke University. He completed his pre-doctoral clinical psychology internship and post-doctoral fellowship at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh, and joined the University of Pittsburgh faculty in 2010. Dr. Jones was awarded a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Scientist Development Award to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying rumination in depression. His initial program of research has focused on clarifying the maladaptive effects of ruminative thinking on treatment outcomes and clinical symptoms; delineating neural circuits involved in rumination thinking; and developing treatments to address the identified mechanisms. His current research focuses on applying techniques from cognitive affective neuroscience to better understand how cognitive, motivational, and emotional systems interact to give rise to endophenotypes (e.g., rumination, impaired cognitive control, impaired inhibitory control) of psychopathological disorders.