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STUDY BASICS

Do you experience a sudden, strong urge to urinate or “overactive bladder” that sometimes results in urine leakage? Do situations such as running water or approaching the front door trigger your urgency? Women aged 40 or older may be able to participate in a research study to help find out if two non-drug treatments can improve urinary incontinence. Compensation and travel expenses are provided.


STUDY PURPOSE

Women with urinary urge incontinence or “overactive bladder” have a sudden, strong need to urinate and are sometimes unable to reach the bathroom in time. For some people, urinary urgency may be triggered by certain situations such as seeing running water or approaching the front door at home.  Although exercises and medications may improve urinary urge incontinence for some women, these treatments are not always effective and may have side effects.

 

The purpose of the study is to find out if two non-drug treatments—mindfulness and transcranial direct current stimulation—can improve urinary urge incontinence in women. Mindfulness is a type of guided meditation that can help people become more aware of their body in the moment. Transcranial direct current stimulation uses weak electrical stimulation to temporarily affect brain activity. Researchers hope their findings lead to better ways to manage urinary urge incontinence in the future.


COULD THIS STUDY BE RIGHT FOR YOU?
  • Women aged 40 and up
  • Experience urinary urgency or “overactive bladder”
  • Find that certain situations (such as approaching your front door or seeing running water) trigger a need to urinate
  • Experience urine leakage associated with urgency (sudden, strong need to run to the bathroom with fear of leakage) at least twice per week

WHAT PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT

This study involves seven 2-hour visits over about three weeks. Participants will be randomly assigned to take part in one of three groups: mindfulness alone, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alone, or mindfulness plus tDCS. Study procedures include completing questionnaires and tests, taking pictures of places that cause urinary urgency, and keeping a daily diary.


IRB:
  STUDY19110132 - Mindfulness + tDCS to Reduce Urgency Incontinence in Women

RESEARCH AREAS:
  Featured Research , Women's Health

Age Range
AGE:   40 and up

 
Gender List
SEX ASSIGNED AT BIRTH:   Female

Duration DURATION:  3 weeks
VISITS:  7

Location LOCATION: 
UPMC Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic - Oakland
Compensation COMPENSATION: 

Up to $325 & parking/bus fare reimbursement

Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230
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Phone Number PHONE NUMBER:
1-866-438-8230

MEET THE RESEARCHERS


Cynthia Conklin

Cynthia A. Conklin, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Conklin’s research interests include tDCS brain stimulation & combined therapies, as well as methods to reduce cue-reactivity in smokers.





Becky Clarkson

Becky Clarkson, PhD, is a Research Assistant Professor in Medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Clarkson’s research interests include the link between the brain and the bladder in urge urinary inconsistence, situationally triggered urinary urgency and the development of new and improved incontinence treatments.





MEET THE COORDINATOR


Ronald Salkeld

Ron Salkeld BS, is the research coordinator and primary study personnel, with many years of experience running smoking cessation and urinary incontinence research studies. His research specialty is administering tDCS in a number of therapeutic applications and measuring the link between environmental cues and triggers for physiological processes such as nicotine craving and urinary urgency.




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